Celebrating Nigeria’s Independence – History Lesson 7

Celebrating Nigeria’s Independence – History Lesson 7

Life mask of Osifekunde commissioned by Pascal d’Avezac-Macaya around 1838 from “Africa Remembered: Narratives by West Africans from the Era of the Slave Trade” by Phillip d. Curtin. “Osifekunde of Ijebu” Osifekunde was an Ijebu man who was captured and sold to Brazilian slave merchants by Ijaw pirates when he was 20 years old in(…)

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Celebrating Nigeria’s Independence – History Lesson 6

Celebrating Nigeria’s Independence – History Lesson 6

  Margaret Ekpo, Activist, Feminist Country: Nigeria Margaret Ekpo (1914-2006) was a Nigerian women’s rights activist and social mobilizer who was a pioneering female politician in the country’s First Republic and was a leading member of a class of traditional Nigerian women activists, many of whom rallied women beyond notions of ethnic solidarity. She played(…)

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Celebrating Nigeria’s Independence – History Lesson 4

Celebrating Nigeria’s Independence – History Lesson 4

Col. Odumegwu Ojukwu at Nigerian-Biafran peace talks in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia where the Emperor Haile Selassie is chairman of the committte. Aug 5 1968. We all know of the brutal civil war that lasted for 3 years between Nigeria and the Eastern part of the country. The eastern part of Nigeria [Mainly the ibos] wanted to(…)

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Celebrating Nigeria’s Independence – History Lesson 3

Celebrating Nigeria’s Independence – History Lesson 3

Photo taken in Southern Nigeria during The Aro Punitive Expedition 1901. The Anglo–Aro War (1901–1902) was a conflict between the Aro Confederacy in present day Eastern Nigeria, and the British Empire. The war began after increasing tension between Aro leaders and British colonialists after years of failed negotiations.

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Celebrating Nigeria’s Independence – History Lesson 2

Celebrating Nigeria’s Independence – History Lesson 2

“ekule baba” Greetings in Yoruba culture, 1960 Vintage Nigeria Know as “Idobale” in the Yoruba language and Postrate in english or at least that’s what was yelled at me when I was younger and did not greet an older person fast enough. The version pictured above is the modified version. Originally you would have had(…)

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Celebrating Nigeria’s Independence – History Lesson 1

Celebrating Nigeria’s Independence – History Lesson 1

Yesterday marked the 53rd year since Nigeria gained independence from her British colonial SLAVE masters. [1st october 1960 incase you didn’t know] i was unable to post anything yesterday because of web server issues, however that has now been sorted and i will post some “Goodies” of Nigerian history that they don’t teach you in(…)

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